Aspirin

Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke

Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke

You can walk into any pharmacy, grocery or convenience store and buy aspirin without a prescription. The Drug Facts label on medication products, will help you choose aspirin for relieving headache, pain, swelling, or fever.

The Drug Facts label also gives directions that will help you use the aspirin so that it is safe and effective. But what about using aspirin for a different use, time period, or in a manner that is not listed on the label? For example, using aspirin to lower the risk of heart attack and clot-related strokes.

In these cases, the labeling information is not there to help you with how to choose and how to use the medicine safely. Since you don’t have the labeling directions to help you, you need the medical knowledge of your doctor, nurse practitioner or other health professional.

You can increase the chance of getting the good effects and decrease the chance of getting the bad effects of any medicine by choosing and using asprin wisely. When it comes to using aspirin to lower the risk of heart attack and stroke, choosing and using wisely means:

FACT: Daily use of aspirin in not right for everyone

Aspirin has been shown to be helpful when used daily to lower the risk of heart attack, clot-related strokes and other blood flow problems. Many medical professionals prescribe aspirin for these uses.

There may be a benefit to daily aspirin use for you if you have some kind of heart of blood vessel disease, or if you have evidence of poor blood flow to the brain. However, the risks of long-term aspirin use may be greater than the benefits if there are no signs of, or risk factors for heart or blood vessel disease.

Every prescription and over-the-counter medicine has benefits and risks — even such a common and familiar medicine as aspirin. Aspirin use can result in serious side effects, such as stomach bleeding, bleeding in the brain, kidney failure, and some kinds of strokes.

No medicine is completely safe. By carefully reviewing many different factors, your health professional can help you make the best choice for you.

FACT: Daily aspirin can be safest when prescribed by a medical health professional

Before deciding if daily aspirin use is right for you, your health professional will need to consider:

* Your medical history and the history of your family members

* Your use of other medicines, including prescription and over-the-counter

* Your use of other products, such as dietary supplements, including vitamins and herbals

* Your allergies or sensitivities, and anything that affects your ability to use the medicine

* What you have to gain, or the benefits, from the use of the medicine

*Other options and their risks and benefits

* What side effects you may experience

* What dose, and what directions for use are best for you

* How to know when the medicine is working or not working for this use

FACT: Aspirin is a drug

If you are at risk for heart attack or stroke your doctor may prescribe aspirin to increase blood flow to the heart and brain. But any drug — including aspirin — can have harmful side effects, especially when mixed with other products.

In fact, the chance of side effects increases with each new product you use. New products includes prescription and other over-the-counter medicines, dietary supplement, (including vitamins and herbals), and sometimes foods and beverages.

For instance, people who already use a prescribed medication to thin the blood should not use aspirin unless recommended by a health professional. There are also dietary supplements known to thin the blood. Using aspirin with alcohol or with another product that also contains aspirin, such as a cough-sinus drug, can increase the chance of side effects.

Your health professional will consider your current state of health. Some medical conditions, such as pregnancy, uncontrolled high blood pressure, bleeding disorders, asthma, peptic (stomach) ulcers, liver and kidney disease, could make aspirin a bad choice for you.

FACT: Once your doctor decides that daily use of aspirin is for you, safe use depends on following your doctor’s directions

There are no directions on the label for using aspirin to reduce the risk of heart attack or clot-related stroke. You may rely on your health professional to provide the correct information on dose and directions for use.

Using aspirin correctly gives you the best chance of getting the greatest benefits with the fewest unwanted side effects. Discuss with your health professional the different forms of aspirin products that might be best suited for you.

Aspirin has been shown to lower the risk of heart attack and stroke, but not all over-the-counter pain and fever reducers do that. Even though the directions on the aspirin label do not apply to this use of aspirin, you still need to read the label to confirm that the product you buy and use contains aspirin at the correct dose.

Check the Drug Facts label for “active ingredients: aspirin” or “acetylsalicylic acid” at the dose that your health professional has prescribed. Remember, if you are using aspirin everyday for weeks, months or years to prevent a heart attack, stroke, or for any use not listed on the label — without the guidance from your health professional — you could be doing your body more harm than good.

Key Facts and Tips about Asprin

When you don’t have the labeling directions to guide you, you need the medical knowledge of your doctor, nurse practitioner, or other health professional.

Make sure to tell your health professional all the medicines (prescription and over-the-counter) and dietary supplements, including vitamins and herbals, that you use — even if only occasionally.

Make sure that all your health professionals are aware that you are using aspirin to reduce your risk of heart attack and clot-related strokes.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Food and Drug Administration

 

 

 

 

FAQ

What is aspirin used for?

Aspirin is used to reduce fever and relieve mild to moderate pain from conditions such as muscle aches, toothaches, common cold, and headaches. It may also be used to reduce pain and swelling in conditions such as arthritis.

Is aspirin a blood thinner?

It can help prevent a heart attack or clot-related stroke by interfering with how the blood clots. But the same properties that make aspirin work as a blood thinner to stop it from clotting may also cause unwanted side effects, including bleeding into the brain or stomach.

What does aspirin do in the body?

In addition to chemically blocking your body’s pain signals, aspirin can also reduce the risk of heart attacks and certain strokes. Aspirin works to prevent the platelets in your blood from clumping and clotting in your arteries, thereby reducing these risks by improving blood flow to your heart and brain.

Can aspirin be taken daily?

Don’t start taking a daily aspirin without talking to your health care provider. While taking an occasional aspirin or two is safe for most adults to use for headaches, body aches or fever, daily use of aspirin can have serious side effects, including gastrointestinal bleeding.

Aspirin is safer than acetaminophen, he said, though to be used as a pain reliever it requires much higher doses — which can have side effects like stomach upset. Aspirin also interferes with blood coagulation for days after taking it.

What are the side effect of aspirin?

COMMON side effects

* conditions of excess stomach acid secretion.

* irritation of the stomach or intestines.

* nausea.

* vomiting.

* heartburn.

* stomach cramps.

Can an aspirin a day hurt you?

Doctors Warn Daily Aspirin Use Can Be Dangerous. Many people take daily aspirin under the mistaken impression it will help their heart. But taking the drug every day can also increase the risk of bleeding and other cardiovascular issues.

Is it safe to take 75 mg aspirin daily?

It’s usual to take a dose of 75mg once a day. Sometimes doses may be higher. It’s best to take low-dose aspirin with food so it doesn’t upset your stomach. Taking low-dose aspirin isn’t safe for everyone.

Is it safe to take aspirin 3 times a week?

A study of aspirin and cancer risk conducted among 146,152 older adults and published in December in JAMA Network Open found that taking the drug three or more times a week was associated with a reduced risk of death over all and a lower risk of death from cancer, especially colorectal cancer and other gastrointestinal

Does aspirin raise blood pressure?

Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID); NSAIDs can actually raise blood pressure in people with hypertension.

Should aspirin be taken morning or night?

There is a body of research that suggests the majority of heart attacks occur in the morning. So taking aspirin before bedtime may be the better bet as it allows time for the medication to thin the blood, which reduces the risk of heart attack.

Does aspirin help prevent heart attacks strokes?

Low-dose aspirin helps to prevent heart attacks and strokes in people at high risk of them. Your doctor may suggest that you take a daily low dose if you have had a stroke or a heart attack to help stop you having another one.

Can aspirin save you from a heart attack?

When taken during a heart attack, aspirin slows clotting and decreases the size of the forming blood clot. Taken daily, aspirin’s anti-clotting action helps prevent a first or second heart attack.

What effects does aspirin have that would help prevent heart attacks?

When taken during a heart attack, aspirin slows clotting and decreases the size of the forming blood clot. Taken daily, aspirin’s anti-clotting action helps prevent a first or second heart attack.

How much aspirin should you take to prevent heart attack?

Low doses of aspirin — such as 75 to 100 milligrams (mg), but most commonly 81 mg —can be effective at preventing heart attack or stroke. Health care providers usually prescribe a daily dose between 75 mg and 325 mg (a regular-strength tablet).

How long does aspirin stay in your system?

It takes a full 10 days for aspirin’s effects to wear off after a person stops taking it.

How quickly does aspirin work to thin blood?

By all three measurements, chewed aspirin worked fastest. It needed only five minutes to reduce TxB2 concentrations by 50%; the Alka-Seltzer took almost 8 minutes, and the swallowed tablet took 12 minutes.

How  do you stop bleeding when taking aspirin?

To stop the bleeding:

* Put a clean towel, cloth, or bandage on the wound.

* Press on it firmly until the bleeding stops (don’t press on something stuck in your skin)

* Keep it in place with medical tape or your hands.

* Raise the injury above your heart if you can.

What organ is damaged by taking too much aspirin?

Acute overdose happens if you accidentally take too much aspirin at one time. It leads to stomach upset, pain, nausea and vomiting. The severe irritation of the stomach lining can cause ulcers to develop. Permanent damage to the gastrointestinal tract is possible.