Tips And Remedies To Stop Snoring

Tips And Remedies To Stop Snoring

Tips And Remedies To Stop Snoring

 

Snoring – a Small Change Can Make a Big Difference

We all know how annoying snoring can be, both for the snorer and the partner. The effects and seriousness of snoring are becoming more apparent with snoring being linked to conditions like high blood pressure and coronary disease.

The different types of snoring, range from a simple puff to a full on roar and there isn’t one school of thought on the reasons behind snoring. Snoring, I believe, is a signal that the body’s systems are out of balance.

Finding which system is the difficult part. But correcting the balance may not take a huge change, take the example of y.

Andy was in his late 30s and had snored for several years. He’s not quite sure when it started but of late the snoring had being a more regular event.

He probably still wouldn’t be aware of it, except it drove his wife crazy. Andy had always being active, not a football star but he liked to throw a ball around.

If you asked a passerby, they wouldn’t describe Andy as overweight but Andy freely admits putting on a pound a year over the past 10 years and plans to start shedding some of it sometime soon.

Every year Andy and the family, his wife and two sons go camping. They always go to the same camping ground every year and always get the same site, or there about, near the water and away from the highway.

Andy doesn’t believe a holiday should be hard work and the family doesn’t lack for comfort with inflatable mattresses, electric cooler, color TV (just for the news) and a large three room tent. Now last year the shower block at Andy’s end of the camp ground was under going a major renovation for the two weeks of Andy’s holiday.

It wasn’t a major problem; it just meant that Andy had his nightly shower at the other shower block. But because Andy and his wife preferred that the boys didn’t have to walk in the dark they showered a couple hours earlier than normal.

After a couple of days after arriving Andy’s wife Karen noted that Andy wasn’t snoring nearly as badly as he normally did. On past holidays even the boys would mention how annoying dad’s snoring was.

They too had noticed a more quiet night. Andy was pleased as he too had noticed that he awoke more refreshed in the morning and his mouth didn’t feel like someone had left sandpaper in it.

He didn’t know what change he had made that brought this unexpected and pleasant result, but he suspected it had to do with his nightly routine, as this was the only thing that had changed.

Over the next two weeks Andy experimented with his routine and finally came to the conclusion that if he brushed his teeth several hours before going to bed rather than just before retiring he didn’t snore so much, if at all, and he woke in the morning without his mouth feeling all dry.

That simple change has made a big difference to Andy and Karen. Andy deduced that when he brushed his teeth just before retiring, the toothpaste was making him a little dehydrated.

It was enough to dry out the nasal passages and cause him to breathe through his mouth making the snoring noise.

By brushing earlier he didn’t suffer the same dehydration and was able to breathe through his nose the whole night through. Now Andy also realized that toothpaste alone shouldn’t be able to have such a major effect.

It was that his body was very near the balance point and the toothpaste was the final small push over the edge. Andy decided he was to close to that fine balance point and began to look at his whole diet. He has made some small adjustments to his diet.

He has lost a little weight, but that’s a bonus and he only now snores if he over indulges and that’s usually when he catches up with college buddies twice a year.

The chance of eliminating your snoring by changing when you brush your teeth is probably less than one in a thousand. Andy’s problem probably is your problem.

The key is to find the system that is out of balance and work to set it right. You never know, you may only need the smallest of change. Is it worth the effort? You decide.

Copyright © 2004 Kevin Meates. Kevin Meates writes for www.snoring-solutions-that-work.com where you can find a set of strategies for overcoming all types of snoring problems. Please feel free to use this article in your Newsletter or on your website. If you use this article, please include the resource box and send a brief message to let me know where it appeared: mailto:kmeates@snoring-solutions-that-work.com

FAQ 

What is the reason for snoring?

Snoring can be caused by a number of factors, such as the anatomy of your mouth and sinuses, alcohol consumption, allergies, a cold, and your weight. When you doze off and progress from a light sleep to a deep sleep, the muscles in the roof of your mouth (soft palate), tongue and throat relax.

Is it bad to snore?

Snoring once in a while isn’t usually a serious problem. It’s mostly a nuisance for your bed partner. But if you’re a long-term snorer, you not only disrupt the sleep patterns of those close to you, you hurt your own sleep quality. Snoring can itself be a symptom of a health problem like obstructive sleep apnea.

Is there a cure for snoring?

Many snoring treatments are available over-the-counter in pharmacies, but most do not cure snoring. There are, however, a number of steps you can take to put an end to your snoring. Here are some tips for the occasional snorer: Lose weight and improve your eating habits.

Do skinny people snore?

Being overweight increases fat around the neck, compressing and narrowing the throat. But thin people do snore too, and many who are overweight do not.

When should I see a doctor about snoring?

Your doctor should evaluate any snoring that causes daytime sleepiness or that affects your ability to think clearly. If your partner hears you stop breathing during the night, call your doctor to see if sleep apnea is to blame.

Is snoring every night normal?

What is Snoring?

While it’s true that snoring is very common, it’s not normal, and snoring often points to a bigger problem. If you snore every night it’s a sign that the air isn’t moving freely through your nose and throat, and you’re experiencing some amount of obstruction in your breathing pathways.

Does honey help with snoring?

Olive oil and honey contain anti-inflammatory properties, which help ease the obstruction in the respiratory tract and reduce the swelling. They also lubricate the throat and reduce snoring. Method: Take half a teaspoon of honey and half a teaspoon of olive oil. Mix it properly and drink it before going to bed.

Why do I snore so loud?

When you suddenly start snoring, the culprit is usually an obstructed windpipe. Alcohol and some medications, weight and exercise changes, aging, and some oral and jaw issues are the most common causes of sudden snoring. Think jaw misalignment or partially erupted wisdom teeth are causing your snoring?

What is the root cause of snoring?

The root cause of snoring is vibration of the tissues while breathing. Some medications as well as alcohol can lead to enhanced relaxation of muscles during sleep. As the muscles of the palate, tongue, neck, and pharynx relax more, the airway collapses more. This leads to a smaller airway and greater tissue vibration.

What foods to eat to stop snoring?

Pineapple, oranges and bananas. If you are getting quality sleep, snores are bound to get reduced. This can be achieved by increasing the intake of melatonin in the body. Melatonin makes one sleepy and pineapples, oranges and bananas are rich in it.

Why does my husband snore so loud?

Temporary factors. Snoring can be caused by a whole number of temporary factors, including sedative use, consumption of alcohol, excessive smoking, seasonal allergies, swollen tonsils, sleeping position and the cold or flu. These factors occur for a short time and are not permanent.

Is snoring bad for your health?

Heavy snoring can sound funny to your sleep partner, but the condition is no joke. Snoring is often the sign of a condition called obstructive sleep apnea, which raises the risk for diabetes, obesity, hypertension, stroke, heart attack and other cardiovascular problems.

How successful is snoring surgery?

Laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty (LAUP) is considered a popular and well-received surgical procedure to eliminate snoring and to treat obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Reports on the efficacy of the procedure for snoring were promising, with a clinical success rate ranging from 70% to 95%.