Early Childhood Caries

Causes and Treatment of Early Childhood Caries among Children

Causes and Treatment of Early Childhood Caries among Children

 

As parents with children, have you realized that your children are suffering the threat to the dental health of their kids, early childhood caries (or called ECC)? ECC, as the acronym for a medical condition called early childhood caries, often occur in tiny tots, which is a syndrome  characterized by severe decay in the teeth of infants or young children. Usually, mothers with untreated dental disease present a very high risk to their children.

The common reason for ECC developing is when a bottle-fed infant or toddler is accustomed to drinking sweetened beverages before sleeping and falls asleep with the teat to the mouth. This may include juice, milk or any other sweetened children’s drink, all of which can result in transferring nursing-bottle caries to the child, resulting in a severe milk-bottle syndrome.

It should be noted by parents keen on safeguarding their little ones that this is a pretty common childcare dental health threat that affects 3 year olds and smaller kids. So, proper weaning and the practice of drinking from a cup after the age of 1 year and avoidance of nighttime bottle-in-mouth instances particularly, is advised.

During the daylight, when the child sleeps for a shorter time, and is awake for the most part, the constant flow of saliva enables any acids built up on the surface of the tooth or teeth to get washed away, but this is considerably reduced when a child is asleep, which is more likely at night. 4 of the top front teeth are most likely to display ECC symptoms, which are distinguished by chalky white marks caused by acids that decalcify them. Not only do these look unsightly, but also if left unchecked, can be very painful for the child’s and prevent proper holding space developing in the baby’s mouth for future permanent teeth.

By understanding its causes and applying prompt treatment approaches, you can help prevent painful cavities from developing and keep the smiles on your precious little ones intact. ECC is a serious problem if you don’t pay much attention to it because it usually brings a bad side effect to most children’s whole life.

 

 

FAQ

What age is early childhood caries?

The disease of early childhood caries (ECC) is the presence of 1 or more decayed (noncavitated or cavitated lesions), missing (due to caries), or filled tooth surfaces in any primary tooth in a child 71 months of age or younger.

How do you get rid of early childhood caries?

Proper treatment for early childhood caries depends on how far the disease has progressed. A minor cavity in a child’s tooth may be treatable with a simple dental filling, whereas treating a deep cavity may require pediatric pulp therapy or even baby tooth extraction.

What Causes Early Childhood Cavities?

What Causes Early Childhood Caries? It happens when liquids and foods that contain sugar, like milk and juice, are left in your child’s mouth for many hours. Bacteria love sugar and use it to make acids that, overtime, destroy your child’s teeth.

How is early childhood caries diagnosed?

The WHO criterion for caries diagnosis is the late stage event of dentine cavitation. Earlier stages of the caries lesion are clinically detectable and should be registered earlier in the life of children and arrested/remineralized before lesions progress to the cavitation stage.

What are symptoms that the child may experience with early childhood caries ECC?

Some of the potential consequences of ECC are acute and chronic pain; interference with the child’s eating, sleeping and proper growth; tooth loss and malocclusion; increased expenses for dental care throughout life; and compromise of general health.

Which factors places a child at the most risk for developing early childhood caries?

The strongest risk factors associated with early childhood caries was the presence of enamel defects, presence of dentinal caries and high levels of mutans streptococci.

What is another name for early childhood caries?

The term early childhood caries includes the sometimes called nursing caries and rampant caries. “Baby bottle syndrome,” “nursing caries,” or “bottle mouth caries” are names to describe a pattern of caries where the deciduous upper incisors and molars are more severely disrupted.

Is early childhood caries infectious?

Early childhood caries is an infectious disease. There are many aspects of early childhood caries; baby bottle tooth decay is recognized as one of the more severe manifestations of this syndrome.

What is early childhood caries Smiles for Life?

Early Childhood Caries (ECC) is a chronic disease that destroys tooth structure leading to loss of chewing function, pain, and infection in children through five years of age. Defined as > 1 decayed, missing, or filled primary tooth surface in children less than 6 years of age.

Which deciduous teeth are most vulnerable to early childhood caries?

Process of early childhood tooth decay

The upper four front baby teeth are most commonly affected. Other names used to refer to this condition include ‘nursing bottle caries’, ‘infant feeding caries’ and ‘baby bottle decay’.

How can primary care clinicians best help prevent early childhood caries?

ECC risk can be reduced by minimizing children’s exposure to caries-promoting food and drinks, weaning from the bottle as early as possible, and regularly cleaning children’s teeth.

How common is early childhood caries?

Early childhood caries (ECC) is major oral health problem, mainly in socially disadvantaged populations. ECC affects infants and preschool children worldwide. The prevalence of ECC differs according to the group examined, and a prevalence of up to 85% has been reported for disadvantaged groups.

What is early childhood caries dental caries in children from 2/10 years?

Early childhood caries is defined as “the presence of one or more decayed, missing (due to cavities) or filled tooth surfaces in any primary tooth in a child 71 months of age or younger (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2008).

Which primary teeth are least affected with early childhood caries?

Significant differences were observed between boys and girls regarding filled buccal surfaces (p=0.001) and occlusal surfaces (p=0.001) in maxillary teeth. The mandibular first molar was the most commonly affected tooth (93.3%); lower anterior teeth were the least affected teeth (2-4%) among the primary dentition.

How is early childhood caries diagnosed?

The WHO criterion for caries diagnosis is the late stage event of dentine cavitation. Earlier stages of the caries lesion are clinically detectable and should be registered earlier in the life of children and arrested/remineralized before lesions progress to the cavitation stage.