Memory Loss

Herbal and Home Remedies That Prevent Memory Loss

Memory Loss

Herbal and Home Remedies That Prevent Memory Loss

Even a single family member who is senile or afflicted with Alzheimer’s is enough to make anyone dread the possibility. Since women have always lived longer than men, the Ancient Grandmothers have a thing or two to tell us about how to keep our memory sharp until the day we die (at 100+).

These remedies are taken from my book New Menopausal Years the Wise Woman Way. They are arranged in order of safety, with the safest first and the most dangerous last.

“Touch my face, granddaughter,” murmurs Grandmother Growth. Feel the lines that time has worn. Each line tells a story. Feel the lines in my palms. Every line is a memory. Close your eyes and travel with me to your ovaries, real or energetic.

They are your memory baskets. When you feel forgetful, close your eyes and journey to the place of memories. Touch your face, your palms, return to this place, and retrieve the memory you want.”

“And, dearest,” Grandmother’s voice sighs with the wind, “Remember yourself.”

Improve your memory fast with meditation. Start with five minutes a day. You can do it! Breathe out.

Researchers doing double-blind studies on treatments for those with memory loss, dementia, or Alzheimer’s, consistently note that placebos generate a very strong response.

In one instance, those on the placebo did so well that it was suspected that they did not have sufficient impairment at the beginning of the study. So get a bottle, label it “Memory Pills,” fill it with candy or nuts, and take one every time you forget to.

Ginkgo biloba tincture has been well studied for the treatment of those dealing with Alzheimer’s and dementia. In one study, of those taking the leaf extract, 27 percent maintained cognitive functioning and memory, while 86 percent of the placebo group lost functioning. CAUTION: Ginkgo increases aspirin’s blood-thinning effects.

Mental exercise (word puzzles, reading, writing) and physical exercise are important aspects of nourishing and tonifying the brain and memory. Memorize poetry and recite it for friends. Volunteer for Community Theater and memorize your part. The more you use your memory, the stronger it will be.

Lower your blood pressure and improve your memory. In a study of 200 men and women, those with even moderately high blood pressure (164/89) had more memory problems than those with normal blood pressures.

A dropperful of motherwort tincture (Leonurus cardiaca) daily dependably lowers blood pressure and can generally be used safely with drugs if desired. (Do not use capsules of any herb while you are taking a drug.)

My father has been taking 400 IU of d-alpha tocopherol (supplement form of vitamin E) and 2-3 dropperfuls of ginkgo tincture (not capsules) since his non-Alzheimer’s dementia was first apparent, more than fifteen years ago. His doctors remain amazed at the glacial pace of his losses.

Think taking estrogen will save your memory? Think again. The largest (120 women) scientifically rigorous study (Journal of the American Medical Association, January 23, 2000), found 80 percent of the women taking estrogen replacement (and 74 percent of the women taking a placebo) had less memory, less ability to perform daily tasks, and less cognitive functioning after fifteen months of treatment.

Susun Weed** PO Box 64** Woodstock, NY 12498** Fax: 1-845-246-8081** Visit Susun Weed at: www.susunweed.com and www.ash-tree-publishing.com** For permission to reprint this article, contact us at: susunweed@hvc.rr.com** Vibrant, passionate, and involved, Susun Weed has garnered an international reputation for her groundbreaking lectures, teachings, and writings on health and nutrition. She challenges conventional medical approaches with humor, insight, and her vast encyclopedic knowledge of herbal medicine. Unabashedly pro-woman, her animated and enthusiastic lectures are engaging and often profoundly provocative.** Susun is one of America’s best-known authorities on herbal medicine and natural approaches to women’s health. Her four best-selling books are recommended by expert herbalists and well-known physicians and are used and cherished by millions of women around the world. Learn more at www.susunweed.com

 

 

 

FAQ 

How do you know if you have memory problems?

Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, at work or at leisure. Confusion with time or place. Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships. New problems with words in speaking or writing.

Can memory loss be cured?

There’s no cure for some causes of short-term memory lossincluding dementia from Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. However, there are medications that may help to slow progression and ease your symptoms, including short-term memory loss.

What are the main causes of memory loss?

Here are some of the most common causes of memory loss.

Medications. Prescription drugs like benzodiazepines and anticonvulsants are linked to memory disorders.

Head Injury. Head trauma like concussion can lead to memory loss.

* Thyroid Issues.

* Alcohol.

* Lack of Sleep.

* Nutritional Deficiencies.

* Cancer Treatment.

* Stroke.

What are the 3 foods that fight memory loss?

What are the 3 foods that fight memory loss? If you’re asking for 3 foods that fight memory loss, berries, fish, and leafy green vegetables are 3 of the best. There’s a mountain of evidence showing they support and protect brain health.

Can Stress give you memory loss?

Stress, anxiety or depression can cause forgetfulness, confusion, difficulty concentrating and other problems that disrupt daily activities.

How can I test myself for memory loss?

Catch memory problems early, take the SAGE test.

The Self-Administered Gerocognitive Exam (SAGE) is designed to detect early signs of cognitive, memory or thinking impairments. It evaluates your thinking abilities and helps physicians to know how well your brain is working.

Is memory loss reversible?

Memory Loss Treatment

In many cases, it may be reversible with treatment. For example, memory loss from medications may resolve with a change in medication. Nutritional supplements can be useful against memory loss caused by a nutritional deficiency.

At what age does memory loss begin?

Memory loss can begin from age 45, scientists say. As all those of middle age who have ever fumbled for a name to fit a face will believe, the brain begins to lose sharpness of memory and powers of reasoning and understanding not from 60 as previously thought, but from as early as 45, scientists say.

What’s the best medication for memory loss?

There are currently five medications that are FDA-approved to treat memory loss caused by Alzheimer’s disease:

* Donepezil (Aricept)

* Memantine (Namenda)

* Namzaric.

* Rivastigmine (Exelon)

Galantamine (Razadyne)

What is the difference between memory loss and forgetfulness?

Age-related memory loss and dementia are very different conditions, though they may share some overlap in symptoms. However, normal forgetfulness is often caused by lack of focus and it never progresses into serious territory. Dementia, on the other hand, will get worse over time.

short term memory loss

Short-term memory loss is when you forget things you heard, saw, or did recently. It’s a normal part of getting older for many people. But it can also be a sign of a deeper problem, such as dementia, a brain injury, or a mental health issue

long term memory loss

Long-term memory loss is when you have trouble recalling this information when you need it. Many people’s long-term memory starts to get weaker as they get older. This is a normal part of aging. Existing between normal age-related memory changes and dementia is the condition known as mild cognitive impairment (MCI).